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Jiu Jitsu Review: Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)

Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)

Film: Jiu Jitsu

Starring: Alain Moussi, Nicolas Cage, Raymond Pinharry

 

Director: Dimitri Logothetis

Rating: **1/2

Reviewer: George Sylex

Overview - In view of a comic book by Dimitri Logothetis, Jiu Jitsu plays like riff on Beyond the Skyline meets The Bourne Identity and Predator, down to the cognitive decline and extraterrestrial warmth vision. On occasion, it's as wild, unhinged, and fun as that sounds. The film includes actors like Nicolas Cage, Alain Moussi, Tony Jaa, Frank Grillo, JuJu Chan, Marie Avgeropoulos, and Rick Yune.

Jiu Jitsu stars Alain Moussi as Jake Barnes, a military man (amnesiac) who is on the run from a concealed power that is assaulting him. Supporting a serious head injury simultaneously, he is taken in and breast fed back to wellbeing by the military. He is investigated seriously by Myra (Marie Avgeropoulos); who accepts he is no damage to the military until they are assaulted by a gathering of hired soldiers that take Jake in. Driven by Keung (Tony Jaa), the gathering (Juju Chan, Frank Grillo, Marrese Crump, Rigan Machado and others) reveal to Jake that they are companions and it flashes something inside him to find out about his past. The gathering inform him concerning his part in sparing the world through a story where like clockwork, an antiquated request of jiu jitsu warriors unites to fight a horrible race of outsider trespassers. On his mission, he meets ex-military man Wylie (Nicolas Cage), who was intended to battle the outsider intruders six years earlier; yet took the's out in disfavor. To vindicate himself, he joins the gathering and chooses to show Jake with the goal for him to satisfy his fate.

In the event that that sounds tangled, that is not even the half of it. The plot spreads out like a confused, aimless assortment of tentatively composed scenes sewed together by shaky rationale and situation. Furthermore, it leaves the unequivocal vibe that the creation had different entertainers for restricted measures of time, shot what they could, and collected the pieces into some similarity to a story, unceremoniously dispatching characters aimlessly crossroads with expendable lines. However, careful plotting and nuanced characters aren't what the vast majority are coming to Jiu Jitsu for. With a cast that gathers a large number of the best realistic military specialists of this age, we're here to watch boss intergalactic throwdowns.

The action movement by Supoj Khaowwong is perplexing and variable enough for it to energize and veer away from reiteration – including use of weapons like katanas, nunchaku, tonfas, blades and combative techniques styles like muay thai, judo, karate and obviously jiu jitsu. The building up of battle scenes is astute and creative here and there too. In one especially energizing scene, Logothetis and cinematographer Gerardo Madrazo select long takes and afterward continue to change perspectives from Jake to the crowd as spectators; making the activity scene charmingly invigorating. The idea of acting in this sort of film is neither anywhere yet that sort of outlook has traversed for quite a while; implying that military craftsmen on-screen are just observed for their actual ability instead of their acting capacities.

Dimitri Logothetis inclines hard into the B-film absurdity, continually playing it straight aside from when Cage is on screen. He seems to have been given some scope in his restricted screen time. The cast is generally straight-confronted, as well, however they've chiefly been employed based on their actual capacities and not really their actor aptitudes. Star Moussi clearly has the merchandise with regards to the battle arrangements (of which there are many), yet he's actually green before the camera and comes up short on the gravity and magnetism of huge numbers of his activity star archetypes. Maybe Logothetis knows this, which is the reason he acquires substantial hitters like Grillo, who is pretty much squandered here, and Cage, who makes irrefutably the greater part of his scenes.

Final Word - Jiu Jitsu is a little spending science fiction action film where Nicolas Cage and a lot of realistic rebels utilize combative techniques to battle outsiders. This is actually the film guaranteed, for good and sick. With a heavenly cast, relentless battles and sharp execution this ends up being a charming legacy that will satisfy genre fans.

A Pleasant Watch for Genre Fans! 

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Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)

About GeorgeSylex

Film Critic, Writer, Reviewer, Columnist

Summary
Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Jiu Jitsu
Author Rating
3Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)Jiu Jitsu Review:  Beyond the Skyline Shakes Hands with Predator (Rating: **1/2)
Title
Jiu Jitsu
Description
In view of a comic book by Dimitri Logothetis, Jiu Jitsu plays like riff on Beyond the Skyline meets The Bourne Identity and Predator, down to the cognitive decline and extraterrestrial warmth vision. On occasion, it's as wild, unhinged, and fun as that sounds. The film includes actors like Nicolas Cage, Alain Moussi, Tony Jaa, Frank Grillo, JuJu Chan, Marie Avgeropoulos, and Rick Yune.
Upload Date
November 21, 2020
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